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News at Home


  • Debates Are Unpredictable

    by Ron Faucheux

    In a close election, a debate can matter, and debates are lost more than they are won. Some examples from the television era of campaigning should give viewers a sense of how to judge Biden and Trump on Tuesday night. 


  • Anti-racist Lens Distorts History on New Jersey “Freeholders”

    by Tony Fels

    Beginning in 2021, New Jersey county officials will no longer be known as "freeholders." Although the author concedes the term is archaic, and "county commissioner" is a more informative descriptor, the term "freeholder" is not a relic of past racism. 


  • Breaking Lincoln's Promise

    by Shannon Bontrager

    Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg address demanded that Americans keep the memory of both the Union dead and their cause alive and "hot." The cooling of that memory has enabled backlashes against justice through history, and today. 


  • Is This the Most Important Election?

    by Donald J. Fraser

    President Donald Trump may indeed be right, this is the most important election in our history. Just not for the reasons he believes.  


  • The Second Amendment has Never Covered Kenosha Shooter Kyle Rittenhouse

    by Noah Shusterman

    If his lawyer wants to argue that Kyle Rittenhouse was acting in the spirit of those eighteenth-century militias which went outside the law and defied their state government, and especially those who did so in the interest of promoting white supremacy – his case would be historically solid. It would not, however, be an exoneration.


  • The Pentagon is Missing the Big Picture on "Stars and Stripes"

    by Mark T. Hauser

    The Pentagon's plan to scrap funding for the Stars and Stripes newspaper isn't just an attack on a historic military institution. It's ignoring the lessons the paper's history offers for efficient operation and integrating military operations with the economic life of the nation. 


  • Can Biden Beat Van Buren's Curse?

    by Robert Schmuhl

    In 1840, Democrat Martin Van Buren ran for re-election without a running mate, having never embraced the eccentric Richard Mentor Johnson of Kentucky, the man chosen by Senate Democrats to serve as his Vice President. Beginning with Johnson's failed bid for the presidency in 1840, only two of sixteen Democratic Vice Presidents became President, and none came to office by election. 


  • Americans Have Feared Another Civil War Since the End of the Last One

    by Richard Kreitner

    The ink was hardly dry on Lee's surrender at Appomattox before Andrew Johnson's conciliation toward the former Confederacy clashed with the unfulfilled goals of freed slaves and radical Republicans to threaten further violence. These fault lines have been hidden but never healed in the restored American union.


  • Trump Can Use MS-13 as a Prop Because the US Won't Acknowledge a Role in Creating It

    by Roberto Lovato

    Roberto Lovato's new book "Unforgetting: " examines how policing in the United States, including a combined crackdown on immigration and gang activity led by William Barr after the 1992 Los Angeles riots, helped create MS-13 as a transnational criminal gang and a political symbol of fear to be exploited in election years.